Association for Gerontology in Higher Education
Thursday, October 23, 2014
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AGHE CONSULTATION PROGRAM
  

The Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE) designed a NEW Consultation Service that is proactive in supporting educational institutions with meeting the demographic aging imperative requiring innovative and contemporary gerontology/geriatrics instruction and program development.  The AGHE Consultation Program actively contributes to assisting community, four-year colleges and universities in:

  • Developing or evaluating a gerontology/geriatrics program
  • Developing a strategy for long-term planning
  • Obtaining an objective assessment, external review, or validation of a proposed or existing program of gerontology/geriatric instruction
  • Obtaining resource materials for executing, expanding, or evaluating gerontology/geriatrics instruction
  • Identifying tools for designing and implementing gerontology/geriatric content/courses

The AGHE Consultation Program provides a selection of national experts in the field of aging studies for you to choose from to ensure the best possible fit for your institutional needs.

  • Identifying the tools for designing and/or implementing gerontology/geriatrics content/courses into curricula
  • Developing or evaluating a gerontology/geriatrics program
  • Developing a strategy for long-term planning
  • Obtaining an objective assessment, external review, or validation of a proposed or existing program of gerontology/geriatric instruction
  • Obtaining resource materials for executing, expanding, or evaluating gerontology/geriatrics instruction

 

 

AGHE Consultation Service

The needs of each institution are unique; therefore the AGHE Consultation Program has been designed to provide dynamic communication between the institution and the consultant they choose. The Institution is in charge of the process with the consultant reporting to the Institution’s Designee.

 

An AGHE consultant uses his/her unique expertise to objectively evaluate your proposed or existing program and helps identify opportunities and barriers employing a solution-oriented approach. A consultant also provides unbiased comments regarding gerontology/geriatrics instruction,program development, program change, faculty development, program evaluation,etc, in a final report constructed to support the Institutional mission and goals to enhance education on aging. The AGHE consultant may reference the support of his/her colleagues who serve on the AGHE Consultation Committee.

The AGHE Consultant Works with you…
 

 

The Institutional Designee(s)

Contracts with AGHE to ensure the provision of professional consulting services for the institution

Chooses the consultant from a national panel of AGHE Consultants

Determines and arranges the process for consultation (a site visit is recommended)

Maintains communication with AGHE and the consultant throughout the consultation

Reviews the report prior to its finalization

Receives a final report complete with observations, recommendations, suggested plan, and a list of AGHE resources.

 

 

Cost: Scope of work is factored in to determine Consultation Cost. Click for the fee structure as of January 2011.

 

Resource Publications

AGHE's Consultation Program publications are avaluable resource, whether or not you choose to work with a consultant. These resource materials provide information on how to conduct an analysis of proposed or existing gerontology instruction and the needs of the surrounding community, along with a wealth of information on adding, expanding, or evaluating gerontology instruction.

 

Click here for a list of the consultation resource publications.

Answering The Critical Question:

 ~ Does Our Institution Need A Consultant?

The Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE) maintains a panel of consultants for referral to institutions as a proposal for gerontology instruction is being developed or as an existing program is evaluated. In deciding whether you would benefit from the use of a consultant, the Self-Study papers which are part of Gerontology Program Development and Evaluation (available for purchase from AGHE) will be very helpful. If you remain undecided, an external consultant can provide an objective assessment of your proposal or program based upon his or her broad range of experiences and expertise. Review the circumstances below that may assist in clarifying whether a consultant would be advisable:

 

1. Lack of Staff Time or Expertise

There may be individuals on your staff, either faculty members or administrators, who are capable of analyzing, for example, whether the conditions are right on your campus for the gerontology program to be expanded. However, these individuals may not have time to do that analysis properly because of other commitments.

It may also be that you have a specific area of concern with your proposed or existing program that no one on your staff has the expertise to solve. Examples might include exploring new areas of curriculum development or new sources of funding.

2. Need for Objective Assessment

An objective assessment may be needed because of problems with a proposed or existing program of instruction or as a result of budget cuts. There may be general agreement that changes need to be made, but several factors may complicate effective action:

  • No one knows exactly what needs to be done or how to do it.

Faculty and/or staff may be unable to look beyond their own interests to agree upon a course of action that would benefit the overall program.

An external consultant can provide an objective assessment of your proposal or program based upon his or her broad range of experiences and expertise.


3. Lack of Consensus

It may be that extensive work has already been done on your campus to determine the direction of a proposed or existing program of instruction, with different groups coming to different conclusions about what that direction ought to be. A consultant could be helpful in developing a consensus for taking action.

4. Need for External Validation

It may be that none of these problems exist. You may have a proposal for a new gerontology program or to alter an existing program that addresses the needs on your campus and which will solve any problems that currently exist. However, to strengthen your proposal before presenting it to the administration or before beginning implementation, you would like an expert to analyze the situation to make sure that nothing has been missed or misinterpreted and to justify what is being proposed.

An analysis by an outsider would lend weight and objective experience to your proposal, especially an analysis coordinated by AGHE, a national organization representing gerontology programs in higher education.

 

 


 

Click here to obtain the Consultation Request Form